• LANGUAGE ARTS ELECTIVES
     
    AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (141)   5 credits - 1 year                                       Grades 10 - 12

    Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, writing samples, B- or better in Honors English 11, or an A in Enriched English 11, and completion of the summer reading project.

     

    This course can be taken in addition to another English course for 10th grade students and as a stand alone English course for students in 11th and 12th grade.  AP Language and Composition is a college-level, non-fiction reading and writing course. Students develop tools and skills necessary to perform rhetorical analysis of archaic and contemporary prose and write in a variety of modes: narrative, descriptive, expository and argumentative. Special attention is given to creating “clear, cogent, and compelling” arguments, including those that require research, synthesis of primary and secondary sources, and citations. The course content includes materials and exercises designed by the College Board with specific attention being paid to the structure and possible content of the Advanced Placement Examination in English Language and Composition. Students will engage in a variety of writing assignments, which include personal narratives, and both formal and informal writing generated from complex prose, including articles, essays, and longer works of non-fiction such as biography, autobiography, and history. Poetry, drama, and fiction may be read, but the primary material for the course is non-fiction. In addition to major papers and reading responses, students participate in discussion about the assigned reading, teacher-student writing conferences, and large and small group writing workshops. (Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)

     

     

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (140)   5 credits - 1 year                                   Grades 11 - 12

    Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, writing samples, B- or better in Honors English 11, or an A in Enriched English 11, and completion of the summer reading project.

     

    The AP English course is designed for students to read, write, reflect upon and speak about a body of world literature and its meaning to them. The course content includes specific materials and exercises designed by the College Board and specific attention is paid to the construct and possible content of the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition. However, the larger goals of the course are those of an advanced literature and writing course aimed at exposing students to a broad range of literary works, enhancing both expository and expressive writing skills, nurturing insight and perception through regular seminar sessions, and developing an appreciation of the sharing of ideas. The student should be able to engage literature, at times, as a window to a particular historical period, author’s life, and/or characters’ lives, and, at other times, as a reflection of the student’s own experiences. This process of genuine inquiry is necessary for the student’s own fulfillment and appreciation of literature as well as for preparation for responsible participation in small or large group conversation. In speaking, the student should be able to prepare for and participate in small and large group sessions aimed at sharing ideas about the assigned readings. The student will understand that these sessions are not debates but forums aimed at exposing all students to the range of ideas and reactions generated by the assigned reading. (Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.)
     

    JOURNALISM   (170)   5 credits - 1 year                                                                                                      Grades 10 - 12                                                               

    Prerequisites: Recommendation of teachers or guidance counselor, and permission of the instructor through application process.

     

    Journalism is open to all students grades ten through twelve who desire to be on the staff of The Dodger, the MHS on-line newspaper, and who wish to learn the basic elements of producing a high quality student newspaper using state of the art on-line publishing. Students who elect journalism must submit an application to the English department and should have a realistic view of their writing skills and of their ability to meet deadlines and work both independently and collaboratively. Leadership is provided by the editor-in-chief with support from the advisor-teacher. The editor is responsible for all steps of the publication, but the advisor grades and evaluates all staff and the articles they have written.